Tricuspid Valve Stenosis

Overview
  • Stenosis of the tricuspid valve is fairly rare and is most often due to sequelae of Rheumatic Fever. In such cases, it is usually observed in the context of rheumatic mitral stenosis.
Clinical Consequences
  • Tricuspid Valve Stenosis impedes the normal flow of blood from the right atrium into the right ventricle during diastole. Backup of blood in the right atrium increases right atrial pressure which is retrogradely transmitted into the systemic veins. The result is chronic hepatic congestion and hepatomegaly along with peripheral edema and ascites. Patients often display a prominent A Wave as atrial systole against the stenotic tricuspid valve results in an exaggerated increase in right atrial pressure and thus bulging of neck veins.