Pyogenic Granuloma

Overview
  • Pyogenic Granulomas are neither due to infection and are not granulomatous; rather, they are rapidly growing benign exophytic proliferations of small capillaries that are prone to bleeding with minor trauma.
Pathogenesis
  • The etiology of pyogenic granulomas is unclear but a history of trauma to the area is frequently elicited.
Morphology
  • Pyogenic granulomas appear as solitary exophytic or pedunculated deep red papules that grow rapidly in size within a matter of weeks up to roughly 1cm. They bleed easily with minor trauma and in some cases may be ulcerated. These lesions tend to occur on the fingers or gingiva.
  • Histologically, pyogenic granulomas show lobules of dense capillaries separated by fibrous septa. Some have likened their histology to that of exuberant granulation tissue. An inflammatory infiltrate may be present if the lesion has become ulcerated.
Clinical Consequences
  • The rapid growth of pyogenic granulomas can be quite concerning to patients as well as their tendency to bleed. These lesions can also be rather painful. However, they are ultimately benign and can be successfully removed surgically.