Inflammation

Overview
  • The immune system is highly sensitive to processes of Cell Injury and together with local parenchymal cells coordinates a response which attempts to clear the tissue of the injurious stimuli as well as injured cells. If the injurious stimuli is successfully cleared, immune cells and local parenchymal cells then coordinate processes of healing which attempt to restore the original architecture and functionality of the tissue. If the injurious stimuli continues its presence, then a pattern of long-term immune cell residence is developed which often includes concomitant yet chronic activation of healing processes. The word "Inflammation" has been developed to describe the body's response to cell injury and two basic patterns, Acute and Chronic Inflammation, have been described which reflect short and long timescales of this response. Below we describe the general features of Acute and Chronic Inflammation and then delve into several prototypical histomorphological patterns of inflammation which are commonly used in pathological descriptions.
Subtopics
Granuloma